Blue Collar Conversations

Episode 12: Statue Wars, the police and Black Lives Matter protests

June 20, 2020 Blue Collar Conservatism Season 1 Episode 12
Blue Collar Conversations
Episode 12: Statue Wars, the police and Black Lives Matter protests
Chapters
Blue Collar Conversations
Episode 12: Statue Wars, the police and Black Lives Matter protests
Jun 20, 2020 Season 1 Episode 12
Blue Collar Conservatism

How did we go from lockdown to breakdown?

The appalling death of George Floyd in police custody triggered outrage in America; outrage that travelled over 4,000 miles from Minnesota to the streets of London.

At first, there was confusion about how to address the situation here in the UK.  The suddenness with which anger had travelled across the pond, combined with the sensitivities around issues dealing with racism, meant things got quickly out of control.

When the peaceful protests turned to rioting, police seemed to be caught off-guard.  And this happened during the COVID-19 lockdown - a lockdown, up until that moment, the public had largely abided by.

So what happened? Were the police unprepared for riots on the back of lockdown? Should permission for the protests been refused from the outset?  Were the protests distorted by media coverage?  How should the police have handled things?

To help us tackle these questions and more, we speak to:

1) Graham Wettone, retired police officer and author of 'How to be a Police Officer' (01:47 - 14:52)

2) Maurisa Coleman, Ambassador for Notting Hill Carnival and political assistant (15:08 - 24:30)

3) Kash Singh, former Police Inspector and now CEO of One Britain One Nation (24:45 - 29:52)

4) John Apter, National Chair of the Police Federation of England and Wales (30:24 - 37:20)

Show Notes

How did we go from lockdown to breakdown?

The appalling death of George Floyd in police custody triggered outrage in America; outrage that travelled over 4,000 miles from Minnesota to the streets of London.

At first, there was confusion about how to address the situation here in the UK.  The suddenness with which anger had travelled across the pond, combined with the sensitivities around issues dealing with racism, meant things got quickly out of control.

When the peaceful protests turned to rioting, police seemed to be caught off-guard.  And this happened during the COVID-19 lockdown - a lockdown, up until that moment, the public had largely abided by.

So what happened? Were the police unprepared for riots on the back of lockdown? Should permission for the protests been refused from the outset?  Were the protests distorted by media coverage?  How should the police have handled things?

To help us tackle these questions and more, we speak to:

1) Graham Wettone, retired police officer and author of 'How to be a Police Officer' (01:47 - 14:52)

2) Maurisa Coleman, Ambassador for Notting Hill Carnival and political assistant (15:08 - 24:30)

3) Kash Singh, former Police Inspector and now CEO of One Britain One Nation (24:45 - 29:52)

4) John Apter, National Chair of the Police Federation of England and Wales (30:24 - 37:20)