Blue Collar Conversations

Episode 11: The Summer of 2020 & how COVID-19 changed the music industry

June 13, 2020 Blue Collar Conservatism
Blue Collar Conversations
Episode 11: The Summer of 2020 & how COVID-19 changed the music industry
Chapters
00:01:30
Chris Wright, Chrysalis
00:09:04
Ed Barker, formerly George Michael's saxophonist
00:13:35
Natalia Bonner, Violinist
00:19:33
Mark Radcliffe, Radio Broadcaster
00:24:30
Peter Nicholson, Sound Level Events
Blue Collar Conversations
Episode 11: The Summer of 2020 & how COVID-19 changed the music industry
Jun 13, 2020
Blue Collar Conservatism

After another weekend of protests & demonstrations, the only form of mass gathering that has happened in over two months, Blue Collar Conversations asks...

What does the Summer of 2020 have in store for us and will mass gatherings this summer only be ones of protest? 

COVID-19 has certainly changed how we come together, with concerts, music festivals, pride events, theatre shows all disappearing for the foreseeable future - and if these live events go - then so do the livelihood of millions of our country’s musicians. 

How can we reverse that? And bring people back together to celebrate? 

To help us answer how Covid has changed the music industry we speak to 5 industry experts:

1) Chris Wright, founder of Chrysalis Records (01:30)

2) Ed Barker, former saxophone soloist for George Michael (09:04)

3) Natalia Bonner, violinist, providing the music for film soundtracks & tours performing Chamber music (13:35)

4) Mark Radcliffe, Broadcaster, writer & producer (19:33)

5) Peter Nicholson, founder of Sound Level Events in Southampton (24:30)

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

After another weekend of protests & demonstrations, the only form of mass gathering that has happened in over two months, Blue Collar Conversations asks...

What does the Summer of 2020 have in store for us and will mass gatherings this summer only be ones of protest? 

COVID-19 has certainly changed how we come together, with concerts, music festivals, pride events, theatre shows all disappearing for the foreseeable future - and if these live events go - then so do the livelihood of millions of our country’s musicians. 

How can we reverse that? And bring people back together to celebrate? 

To help us answer how Covid has changed the music industry we speak to 5 industry experts:

1) Chris Wright, founder of Chrysalis Records (01:30)

2) Ed Barker, former saxophone soloist for George Michael (09:04)

3) Natalia Bonner, violinist, providing the music for film soundtracks & tours performing Chamber music (13:35)

4) Mark Radcliffe, Broadcaster, writer & producer (19:33)

5) Peter Nicholson, founder of Sound Level Events in Southampton (24:30)

Speaker 1:

[inaudible]

Speaker 2:

welcome to blue collar conversations. Online stopped in the street. This week, I was asked, what does the summer of 2020 have in store for us all? Wow. The question hung in the air. After a weekend of demonstrations, the only form of mass gathering that has happened in over two months, and I wondered will all the gatherings this summer be one of protest. And if they are, does that mean it'll force positive change or reinforced divisions, but just as important as peaceful protests are for change afterwards, we need something that can unify as all something just as potent and powerful and can bring us back together. Music and the arts have always done that. A global language that unifies and tells the story of our time. If protests are the disruptor music is the healer. And as I gaze at the sea of cancellations ahead of us this summer, no concerts, no music festivals, no pride events, no theater, no comedy, no cinema, no premiers , no mass celebrations COVID-19 has certainly changed how we come together. So what does the summer of 2020 have installed for us? First? I joined up with music industry legend, Chris Wright , founder of Chrysalis records, a company. He started in his student basement flat back in 1968 and ask him has COVID changed the music industry forever.

Speaker 3:

COVID-19 is going to change everything. And the longer it's around without a viable cure or a vaccine, the more the changes will get impregnated into all strands of business and society. The way they are adapting currently is based on the fact that everything will be all right very soon. So you have no live concerts right now. You have all the summer festivals are off. There's no big music events in the same way. There's no big sporting events, but people are just assuming, well, soon we will be back to normal while we might not be back to normal. And that's going to be something that people have not faced into.

Speaker 2:

What do you think were in denial about what these seismic changes could be?

Speaker 3:

I think the whole world is in denial. Part of us is saying, Oh, it's great. You know, there's some aspects of this that I really like, but part of us is just, Oh , well, it'll be gone in a few months. And then we'll be back to normal to some extent, I think we are going to have to adjust to the fact that this is something that we should at least have an idea about how we might handle, if it does take longer to get back to where we really think we should.

Speaker 2:

How do you think than the music industry, the theater, the art , you know, what is the seismic change that you think is coming

Speaker 3:

the live side until we can get back to kind of normality that is going to be difficult. And I know we'll tell it with Seattle's closing with them closed down. I mean, for them to be able to come back at the end of this, that might be difficult. I know. I mean , I work in TV production area as well. I mean, that's very difficult. You can't very hard producing any drama or any kind of film or television right now. That's going to have an impact on what we see on our screens. We're beginning to see that already with more and more old repeats and things like that, maybe the gray and the stamps aren't going to be as up to date. So as they , as you're used to them, that's that area is going to be very, very challenging. The other thing I'd like to say is that the creative industry and creative talent have a very adaptable and they're very good at creating things in difficult circumstances. You know, I , the best songs are written by people, you know, in their beds that with no money and they'll girlfriend, rather than, you know, my view written in a hotel suite with a bottle of Dom Perignon to , to drink whilst they're writing it. And that kind of thing is what this industry thrives on. And whether it's the situation with the COVID-19 or the things that are emanating out of, out of the riots on the streets right now, it is all going to be things that are going to be instigators for people. You know, literally coming up with creative ideas, which will become, you know , tomorrow's hit records or hit or hit dramas

Speaker 2:

Tuesday out of angst or heartbreak, you will create sort of music. It is out of that. Those darkest hours, creativity comes, right .

Speaker 3:

It's something which hits you. And because it hits you, you want to, you want to write about it or sing about it or whatever. And I would be disappointed if there wasn't enough going on in the world right now that is causing a lot of people to want to express their feelings in music and literature.

Speaker 2:

Who's going to be the winners in this new age,

Speaker 3:

in terms of the industry as a whole, the people that own catalogs, whether it's recording catalogs or music catalogs are doing pretty well because people have been at home and they've been listening to music on, on Spotify and Apple and the other sites like that. And I know that the numbers for Spotify and Apple have held up very well during the pandemic, as you would expect in much the same way that that figures for Netflix and Amazon have. Th the losers are certainly working musicians. And certainly the people that are involved with the live music events, which is not, not just the musicians, but the sound man , the tour management teams, the roadmap, the road management, or the sound and lights, all of that, the backing singers , the back, the backing musicians , uh , they're clearly having a hard time right now. I don't know how many of them are coping. That is going to be really difficult radio radio, as far as I can see is pretty well unaffected by it. And to some extent benefiting because people are tuning in

Speaker 2:

well , living in quite extraordinary times. What influence do you think that'll have on music?

Speaker 3:

When I think back to youth unemployment in Coventry and the late seventies, early eighties, but , you know, which was where the specials came from with , with songs like too much, too young and, and a ghost town, fantastic records , uh, you know, you think back to, you know , the late sixties in the States when, you know, 650,000 kids got sent off to Vietnam and all of the songs written about that. And right now with what's going on and there's disruption in the world on so many different levels, it's the perfect environment for people to want to express themselves about their feelings and their thoughts.

Speaker 2:

Chris, you're a talent spotter as well. I mean, my favorite female artist of all time has to be Debbie, Harry. You were the person who spotted her , uh, gave her the, the record deal. How are you going to spot these people? Now

Speaker 3:

someone can send a link to their music electronically to anybody now, okay, you can't go and see them to a demo session or pub gig or something, but you're going to be able to hear the music and you're going to be able to make evaluations on that. I think one thing which is difficult is that I always, I always met the artist. I always felt that for an artist to be successful, it wasn't entirely just about the talent you had to find out if they are , if they really were focused and knew what they were doing and had the, where with all, to be able to manage, developing their career and to manage the success that that brings. And I think that is the difficult bit, because there's only so much you can do in that respect that you would normally do in a face to face meeting. So that's a difficult thing. I mean, I, I would personally struggle to sign somebody just based on the music over the internet. I would really want to engage with them. And I think that is going to be difficult, but I guess, you know, people will take a chance on it and it'll quite often work out

Speaker 2:

what is the future for music?

Speaker 3:

Well, the business has always been about creativity and talent. The platforms evolve , the distribution platforms for music have evolved though over the last hundred and nearly 150 years , uh , I've seen it involve in my lifetime from, from, you know, vinyl records to CDs and tapes and , and now to , uh, to electronically delivered music, the platform changes. The music is always there.

Speaker 2:

I leave Chris to join ad Barker , a musician, and form a saxophone soloist for George Michael and ask, how does social distancing unperforming work?

Speaker 4:

It's just very hard because obviously the social distancing thing at the moment in Britain, we have this two meter rule a lot. What other countries are actually got one or one and a half meters. And I think perhaps that's something the government needs to be looking at because it might make it easier for some of these industries to return. But audiences congregating in a concert hall or in a theater or at a festival is the precise opposite of social distancing and musicians sitting alongside each other in an orchestra or in a West end show pit. That's the precise opposite of social distancing as well. You can perhaps look at adapting other industries to make sure that they conform with social distancing and become COVID secure, but you can't do that in an orchestra.

Speaker 2:

Could we be saying goodbye to lots of people in the music industry and to theater itself?

Speaker 4:

Well, yeah, I mean it contributes billions to the economy. All they've known is going into a theater and playing eight shows a week. And gradually as, as the, as this thing kind of keeps on folding , they're thinking, well, I've got to survive financially. So they're going to have to be forced unless something changes to do something else. And then we've all got to think, well, we're not going to have live entertainment in this country anymore. We're not going to be able to go into a theater and have a live orchestra playing. Perhaps people don't really appreciate that. We're not going to have live concerts. Cause these musicians are just going to retrain and do something completely different. There's so many industries that are impacted. It's not just even the people that you see on the stage or that you hear. There's a vast amount of self employed people as well, that are being affected by this, that can't return to work. And that also aren't getting any government support at the moment.

Speaker 2:

How hard is it financially on musicians at the moment, at the

Speaker 4:

beginning of lockdown, I managed to get together over 2000 musicians and we signed the letter to the chancellor and that led to the self-employed support scheme, but this still two major gaps. And there's about 3.2 million people that aren't covered. The 1.2 million people aren't covered under the self employed scheme because of some past earnings they might've had in 2016 before even the EU referendum took place, which seems ridiculous to me because as a musician, you can have a gig one year and then you can have no gig the next year. If you're on a top tour, for example, it's not realistic to expect that people's income is the same from year to year. And then there's 2 million people who arranged their affairs by being directors of companies. Many times, the reasons that they do that is because they can't get certain contracts for insurance reasons unless they are a company. So they just arrange themselves as a company, even though it's just them essentially, but it's still, they're still in the same position. They're just self employed individuals trying to make a living. And there's 2 million of those that aren't covered by any , uh, any of the government schemes at all. So you've got over 3 million, essentially. Self-employed people not knowing what to do, not allowed to go back to work and not being given any support by the except being told to rely on universal credit. We're going to shatter these industries. If we were not taking account of the fact, they're just going to have to survive somehow. And that means they're going to leave those industries behind, which I think is going to be bad for the rest of us.

Speaker 2:

And what are they looking to do? I mean, how are people earning across

Speaker 4:

cobbling together or living in any way they can, I've been doing a little bit of remote recording for people. I just set up a microphone in my house and just play for people on their albums. And a few people are actually finding that the extra time means they are bringing out projects that they were previously working on, but perhaps didn't have time to finish because they were so busy doing the day job and gigging and doing shows and things. So there've been a few of those for me. And then also teaching people online. I have this thing called ed sack school , um, and people buy courses. Oh yeah, yeah , yeah. The ed sec school. And I teach people on Skype sometimes. And , and then they can buy courses with me, teaching them how to learn, how to play the saxophone in six months. So I've been having some fun with that and spending a bit more time updating some of that content and the handouts and the backing tracks. And yeah, I mean, it's, I much prefer being out there playing and that pays better. That's why I used to do it, but the moment we just have to try and survive in the best way we can

Speaker 2:

meet Natalia boner , freelance musician who works on film recordings and soundtracks and tours, performing chamber music. How's your working life change Natalia?

Speaker 5:

Well, before COVID-19, I was working very hard. I basically have a policy of taking on every bit of work that I can. I've always had this feeling that you never know when your next work is going to come in as a freelancer. So I've probably been working six days a week. Um, of course, because I'm freelancing, it's very varied time scale . So sometimes I'll just be working for one day, it'll be a rehearsal and a concert. Other times I'll be doing two weeks of back to back sessions, sometimes nine hours a day. Um, for two weeks solid day, getting a Epic film score done. Uh, sometimes I'll be away for a couple of weeks on tour with a chamber orchestra. Um, and basically I'm slotting all of these things in together to make a sort of patchwork of work , um, so that I can pay for our living costs

Speaker 2:

come March. And maybe it was slightly earlier. I don't know for you what started to happen.

Speaker 5:

I'd actually been on tour in China in November, December. I would have been through Wu Han . So when I started to see this happening , um, the, the virus starting and we were had , and I was taking a sort of particular attention that having , uh , just been doing some concerts there. And , um, I think I just sort of felt like this, this is gonna really affect us. This is going to spread and it's going to affect us. And I remember the week before anyone else was really worrying about it, almost having a panic attack , um, I was at work at a studio and saying to a friend, you know , uh , I don't know what's going to happen. I think that everything's going to close down and she was saying, Oh no, don't worry. It's going to be fine. That's not gonna happen here. Um , well of course it did. And it happened suddenly very quickly for us. I actually got called very last minute to go in and cover for someone because they had COVID symptoms. And of course, this is already at the time when it was being highlighted that if you had symptoms, you have to go into sort of personal lockdown. Um, so I went on on to the rehearsal and the artist actually said, well, I haven't been at who she, that she wasn't there at the rehearsal beforehand. And they have to explain, or there's been someone who's had shown symptoms. So , um, Todd is coming to cover and the whole thing was shut down completely at that point. And that was my last day. But , um , we didn't do the concert that night. They canceled the performance. The audience was told not to come. And , um, I haven't performed since. So going from six days a week nonstop much in demand to nothing. How you just dealing with that? My husband's also a freelance musician. So in the same position and he's, he's coping with it a lot better than I am. I'm very up and down. Everything in our household has come to a stop because our work is also our social life. You know , it's a very social thing. You go away on tour with these people. I'm in a chamber orchestra. I've been in it for 15 years. I, you know, these people are like my family. And , um, I really miss my friends playing my violin. I've paid my violence since I was four. I miss playing my violin with other people. I miss the camaraderie of it all. And of course, there's just the huge worry because I have no idea when I'm going to make any kind of living again. Are you still practicing? Is that what you do every day to keep your mind focused? Or if you fallen out of love with your violin while you can't do it, how's your relationship with you , your instruments as it were ? Well, the first couple of weeks, I just couldn't bear to play at all. And because it was just such a shock and the implications were so awful, I've had fits and starts of playing I've, I've played to , um , some Alzheimer's patients. Um, so I've done a little bit of playing to people, you know, obviously in their God and distanced with them, them inside. But , um, yeah, I've done a bit of playing, but I feel really sad about it.

Speaker 2:

And how do you see the future for music? I mean, how do you see the future for live performances?

Speaker 5:

During lockdown ? People have turned to music. They've turned to things like , um, radio watching, TV, watching films, watching Netflix. Well, me and my colleagues, we have created the backdrop of all of those things. So when people are getting solid from music, it's, it's our word that they're listening to. And I think that people have appreciated music more now than perhaps they did before. Of course music's not going to die and people are going to want to go back to concerts and theaters eventually because we have some of the most fantastic musicians, actors in the world. We are world famous for our creative arts. That's not going to go away and I think people will want to go back to it, but it's just when we're allowed. And when it feels safe, I have no answers to that. The recording industry, I am really hoping is going to get started because that will literally be a lifeline for my family.

Speaker 2:

Next I pick up the phone to broadcaster and writer, Mark Radcliffe. He produced John Peel's music show, hosted radio one's breakfast show and covers major festivals for the BBC, like Gluster and break . If anyone knows what's happening with music festivals this year, it's you, what's it looking like at the moment?

Speaker 6:

Most people I know myself included are sort of assuming there won't be any big events or gigs this year. Um , of course what's confusing me and a lot of other people at the moment is , um, well , the rules of distancing actually are, you know what I mean? All these, you know , the , the black lives matter and the anti racism , protests and everything, and we all understand the anger and the, and the, the issues behind that others surely , but I've been sort of surprised to see so many people gathering in one space. Um, and I know the police and government , they can't go in there because we know that kind of how that was they're in a no win situation in a way, but, you know, it's a , it taking the heat out of that argument. What are the rules? You know, how can people get together in a field? We were all assuming it couldn't happen, but it is happening at the moment. Um , not under ideal solutions, you know, for anybody, but it is happening. Um, so will that change things? I mean, certainly, you know, I have got , um, at myself gigs and things that I've got booked in, I've still got things booked in for sort of October, November, December, whether they will happen or not. I don't know. I have severe doubts about it. I mean, I think social distancing in gigs is, is hugely problematic really,

Speaker 2:

but it also raises the question of the need for gatherings. So what purpose do they serve that we have overlooked in lockdown

Speaker 6:

pack animals? To some extent, I mean, I know that some people are more antisocial than others, but there is that great sense of euphoria of sharing some big parts of some massive events, you know, whether it is , um, you know, being at a football match. And, you know, I mean, I often think one of the greatest feelings in the world must be to be a football player who scores a goal into a bank of their own supporters. I mean, the it players who've done that too . I've spoken to say, it's almost like this . As soon as the score, there's a moment of silence before you sort of realize the explosion and the eruption of passion and joy. And, you know, you can't experience that unless you're there really, you can only experience it for carries down the tele .

Speaker 2:

I think there could be the start of an underground movement. I mean, you'll remember the raves in the eighties where people would go into buildings and just sort of take over them. And

Speaker 6:

I think it could do, I think , I mean, I think because, you know, in a way the , the aftermath of the George Floyd is sort of a perfect storm really isn't it, because obviously there are serious issues to be there, to be confronted the issues that are being discussed there and protesting about that things that people feel passionately about that have symmetry for years. But also you put that in combination with people who've been effectively kettled or whatever in lockdown and desperate to get out and desperate for some sorts of reasons, some Raleigh and Cole , and some banner to sort of get together behind and you can see it's a perfect storm. Um, and , um, you know, I think that , um, it is quite possible that things could happen. I mean, you know, there , there , there are possibilities of doing things like , um, you know, like driving cinemas and things. So you could do driving gigs on a big scale, although it's also strange isn't it? Because six months ago we were all trying to dissuade people from getting a car anywhere, and now it tells us to have public transport unless it's necessary. And you've got your mask on , you know, so, so we're in a very, very fluid time where there are no real hard and fast rules as , as , uh , as Dominic Cummings demonstrated, you know, they're all, there are very few certainties. I think people were abated the lock down in my experience. People are bade the lockdown at first, pretty vigorously , really. I think, you know, I know I sat and I did my children and everyone, I know it was sort of a bank it's and still is to a degree really , as you loosen it a bit, it becomes, well, what can you do? What can't you do? And as I said, those , the big racist gatherings do raise that issue. So a lot of the things that people rely on, there's sort of the , the , the sort of landmark events of a summer Glastonbury and things like that. They've all gone. People have accepted that because they understand people can't be together. But if you can, you can be seen to bypass that rule by, you know, protesting about undoubtedly

Speaker 7:

a major issue, undoubtedly, perfectly reasonable grounds to protest, but nevertheless, they are still altogether and that will start people thinking, well, that looks all right. That's a good idea. The police didn't wait into them. So if we want to kind of do organize it , right , you're going to fail. We can say we are socially distant. You know, as soon as the police go, you could stand 10 feet at a time .

Speaker 2:

So why can't music festivals go ahead. Why not indeed meet Peter Nicholson of sound level events in South Hampton . Who's come up with a neat solution. Mind you he's used to putting on all types of music events.

Speaker 7:

We've been very successful in putting shows on, in wonderfully intimate locations, such as on boats, in the old wine cellars beneath the city 400 year old wine cellars within the old city walls , um, promoting local bars and cafes as well. I'm pretty sure it was on there, but since this outbreak, obviously none of these can happen to these local people with their businesses under threat. What have you set about doing, I've set this up as a, as a personal passion, if you like, but with a view to providing income for up and coming businesses in South Hampton. So for example, our videographer, for example, is a 19 year old recently set up his own business, our photographer, again , somewhat , very young, just setting up their own business. I've found guys, they're all young entrepreneurs who want that sort of step into me in the music industry, right ?

Speaker 2:

How dependent are musicians on live events, the

Speaker 7:

other industries that are aligned with it? I think the musicians that we know very well, there was a real panic from everybody that they're in their income was completely stopping . It wasn't so slowing down or being limited to the amount of shows they could do. We were stopping completely. And again, what many people don't realize is how much musicians and live performers rely on payment from their live performances as their almost sole income. Someone who's released a couple of singles on Spotify, for example, will not be hurting anything really from that. But their live performances are where they earn their money and they can sell merchandise , um, and generate an income from that rather than the traditional method of selling CDs and selling records whose livelihoods are under threat at the moment. But it's really started as a late night idea. I had , uh , I saw something about driving cinemas that were quite popular. The weather provided a decent backdoor for it. And I thought, well, why isn't anyone doing a driving game ? Cause it could work exactly the same way. So it went from an idea I had late at night and 10 days later, it had turned into a full sell out show at , um , a country park, just outside of Southampton . How many people that will be attending that we've limited to a very small number of 80 cars. They will draw it into the country park and we will park them spaced out , um, before they even open their windows. So though we've spiced out at least two meters apart,

Speaker 2:

and then what can they do? Do they stay in their car? Can they get out of the car? I mean, so how does it work?

Speaker 7:

Well, what we decided to do is we're going to make sure everybody knows the rules, Dolly email, before they come to the show, we will be handing them out , um , a strict instruction list as they arrive to the park as well. We'll make sure everyone is parked. At least each vehicle is going to be part of at least two meters away from their neighbor. Well, everybody is parked and in place, we're saying that people can get out of their car on the left hand side, if they want to stand and watch the show. That means every family group must be in the same family group to attend the show in that car. Obviously , um, every family group will be at least two meters away from everywhere where everyone else. In fact, there'll be more than that because they will have a car between them. And then now you buy . So it's almost you bring your own barrier with you. So make sure that everybody is safe. Everybody is distanced. People can bring their own picnic, they can bring their own drinks and sit down and enjoy an evening music.

Speaker 2:

Is it that they'd hear the music live, they'd sit outside or are you going to Bluetooth sits to the stereo in the car? Is there anything else that you've added to at any technical wizardry?

Speaker 7:

Yes. We've arranged with a local company who do the sound for the silent discos and also for the drawing cinemas so that when each car arrives , they will be given safely by people wearing the appropriate PP , a sanitized speaker that will sit in their car. So that car will there won't be any lag or delay on it because our sound team that sorted all this out. So there will be the live sound coming straight through to their car. So if it is a bit cold and even that can still sit in their car and enjoy the music and enjoy the spectacle of the stage as well. So we will have a full PA system in the park as well. So if people are outside, I can have to speak to that , but they can still hear the, the live sound from our PA system as well. So it should be quite a spectacular evening. We're really excited for it.

Speaker 8:

[inaudible]

Speaker 2:

when we went into lockdown, one of the first things I saw and quite honestly, I think a lockdown highlight where there was amazing videos posted on social media of people performing from their apartment, balconies people, singing and playing the piano to an unsuspecting yet in thrawled audience, followed by rapturous applause. And I find those videos more moving now than they did two months ago. It showed how humans connect through music, how it suits us and excites us, talks to us at such a deep level protests. Can't be about pulling things down, destroying the past, like some Marxist way of wiping out history. Rather it needs to be about telling the whole story moving forward and progression anger is an important emotion. It brings the energy that forces action, but that anger needs to pass to allow the seeds of change, to take root and grow. Could there be a new summer of change? Could this be it like in 1967, the summer of love when a generation of artists led by the beat generation of poets and writers such as Jack carrack and Allen Ginsburg gathered in golden gate park to celebrate key ideas of the 1960s rebellion, communal living political decentralization and environmental awareness could music, which has always provided a voice for political movement and cultural change do the same. This year 2020 is the summer of a health pandemic. 2020 is a summer when all lives matter. 2020 is the summer of black lives matter. As Chris Wright said could COVID-19. And the events of this year form the Genesis of a great new era of creativity, of storytelling, of new ways of thinking from the darkness of reps, a genius of creativity of change, add galvanized 2000 musicians to ask for support for the country. Self-employed they won that battle, but not the battle to help all the musicians who have lost their livelihoods and long term. What will happen to musicians? Will it become a hobby for most and no career for the few or will online allow the individual to reach out and connect with their own audience, become tick tock sensations with greater autonomy will a new musical platform come along to replace Spotify with a new business model, paying more to artists as live performances, diminish, and does the government need to open up festivals to allow people to come together to celebrate, maybe follow Peter Nicholson's lead of drive in music events, hold these in every park, allow people to come together to seek FUM and solace celebration and commiseration. Let us come together and speak through the medium of music. We need our creatives. We need our musicians.

Chris Wright, Chrysalis
Ed Barker, formerly George Michael's saxophonist
Natalia Bonner, Violinist
Mark Radcliffe, Radio Broadcaster
Peter Nicholson, Sound Level Events